Washington, DC—Today, Representative John Curtis (R-UT) spoke on the House floor, decrying a medical device tax set to be implemented in January 2020. The tax places onerous burdens on Utah medical device manufacturers, an industry that contributes approximately $5 billion annually to the Utah economy as it pioneers innovative medical technologies that help patients live longer and healthier lives.

“Although Congress has come together on a bipartisan basis time and time again to delay its implementation, the continuous threat of heavy, onerous taxation has stifled job growth among medical technology innovators and has delayed cutting-edge research that could potentially lead to breakthroughs in patient care and treatment. The impact would be devastating in Utah, where the MedTech industry employs thousands of Utahns and contributes approximately $5 billion annually to our economy.”

The Congressman’s full remarks, as prepared for delivery, are below:

“Mr. Speaker, I rise today to speak against the Medical Device Tax.

Utah has earned a reputation as a thriving hub for innovation and life sciences, leading the nation in technology breakthroughs. Each year, medical device manufacturers in Utah pioneer new, exciting medical technologies that help patients live longer and healthier lives.

That culture of collaboration and innovation has been threatened by the Medical Device Tax—a tax on device manufacturers that has stalled medical technology investment across the country. 

Although Congress has come together on a bipartisan basis time and time again to delay its implementation, the continuous threat of heavy, onerous taxation has stifled job growth among medical technology innovators and has delayed cutting-edge research that could potentially lead to breakthroughs in patient care and treatment.

As it stands today, this tax will come into effect January 1, 2020. The impact would be devastating in Utah, where the MedTech industry employs thousands of Utahns and contributes approximately $5 billion annually to our economy. One local company estimated that the tax will cost them over $7 million dollars—money that would otherwise be reinvested into workforce and technology development.

As we approach this January deadline, I call upon my colleagues to come together and finally repeal this tax on innovation once and for all.”