Washington, DCYesterday, Representative John Curtis (R-UT), announced the creation of the House GIS (Geographic Information System) Working Group, a nonpartisan staff-led resource available for staff to learn about geospatial policy, how data is being used in the executive branch, and ways that each Congressional Office can use the technology.

Rep. Curtis speaks at the GIS Day event.

“As geospatial data becomes more and more integral to the planning and decision-making process at almost every agency, Congress has an obligation to learn and understand this technology and how it is being used. I am excited to announce the House GIS Working Group, a nonpartisan staff-led resource available for staff to learn about geospatial policy and how data is being used in the federal government. I am looking forward to working with my colleagues, including Rep. Pete Aguilar who has also dedicated a staff member to co-lead this working group, to improve GIS policies and continue to learn how geospatial data is helping map our world.”

Background:

  • Geospatial data has transformed the way that the United States government works. Agencies and private companies are using GIS technology to prepare for and mitigate natural disasters, as well as track population shifts, border crossings, and even find the quickest route to deliver packages.
  • From the Census Bureau to the National Park Service, and Homeland Security to the Highway Administration, geospatial data is becoming integral to the planning and decision-making process.
  • States and local governments have been leading the way in using GIS and this group will enable the federal government taking on a larger role in the GIS space.

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